Of power and luxury: World’s wealthiest people of all time

Jeff Bezos and Bill Gates are often tagged as two of the richest men in modern history, and it’s not an exaggeration that combined, they actually hold the world’s biggest wealth with their net-worth of $130 billion and $91 billion, respectively.  They own one of the largest tech companies in the world, which both play key roles in numerous investment portfolios, including offshore mutual funds based in the likes of Bermuda, Cayman Islands, and Bahamas. While these men occupy the pedestal as the wealthiest people today, digging deeper into the history of the world will reveal an astonishing discovery of richness beyond comprehension.

Here are the wealthiest human beings of all history:

Mansa Musa of Mali

Image source: allthatsinteresting.com

The West African conqueror led the Mali Empire in the 1300s and has amassed a wealth so massive that no one could ever describe the entirety of it. Mansa Musa is often considered as the richest person in human history, according to scholars and historians, because his empire was the largest producer of a highly-valuable precious metal: gold. The emperor was known for his lavish spending that once caused a currency crisis in Egypt during his 200,000-troop pilgrimage to the holy land of Mecca.

Augustus Caesar of Rome

Image source: marketwatch.com

The Roman Empire, before its fall, was once the most powerful in the world not only as a military force but an economic giant. Led by Augustus Caesar, Rome used to own almost 30 percent of the whole world’s economic output. The emperor alone controlled 20 percent of the empire’s economic prowess, which is estimated to have cost over $4 trillion in 2014 standard value.

Emperor Shenzong of China

Image source: wikipedia.com

The Chinese emperor lived from 1048 through 1085 under the Song Dynasty and was one of the world’s wealthiest people of all time. If you’re familiar with the history of this part of Asia, you’ll discover that among all the Chinese imperial periods, the Song was the most economically powerful not only in the continent but throughout the world. At the top of its economic peak, Emperor Shenzong’s centralized power also comes with the full control of the empire’s economic wealth, which was estimated to fall from 25 to 30 percent of the global GDP.

REPOST: 20 Surprising facts about Warren Buffett (Entrepreneur.com)

Did you know that Warren Buffett earned 94 percent of his wealth after he turned 60? That and 19 other interesting things about the “Oracle of Omaha” from this article on ENTREPRENEUR:

 

Image credit: J. Kempin | Getty Images
Often referred to as the “Oracle of Omaha” -- Nebraska native Warren Buffett is an investing legend, business magnate and philanthropist.

When he was 11, Buffett already bought stock, and by 16 he had amassed more than $53,000 from various business ventures and investments. From a young age, Buffett was bound for success.

Although, like anyone else, he faced setbacks. From being rejected at Harvard Business School to getting told he would fail by his father-in-law, hard work and resilience pushed Buffett towards success. Today, he’s recognized for his achievements and uses his money for the greater good.

From using a Nokia flip phone to pledging 85 percent of his Berkshire Hathaway stocks to various charitable foundations, check out these 20 Warren Buffett facts that might surprise you.
  1. He bought his first stock when he was 11-years-old.
While most 11-year-old boys were playing T-ball and reading comic books, Buffett bought stocks. In the spring of 1942, at 11-years-old, Buffett purchased shares of Cities Service Preferred for $38 a piece.
  1. He made $53,000 by the age of 16.
Even since he was young, Buffett’s not only been tactful, but also an extremely hard worker.

When his family moved to Omaha, Neb., Buffett delivered The Washington Post every morning and brought in about $175 a month (that’s more than most teachers made during that time).

He also pursued a few side gigs such as selling used golf balls and collector stamps and buffing cars. By the time he turned 16, he had amassed the equivalent of $53,000.
  1. He was rejected from Harvard Business School.
After graduating from the University of Nebraska in three years, Buffett applied to Harvard Business School. But during a brief interview with the school that would determine his acceptance, the staff said to Buffett: “Forget it. You’re not going to Harvard.”

After much disappointment from the rejection, Buffett discovered that his idols Benjamin Graham (“the father of value investing”) and David Dodd were professors at Columbia Business School.

“I wrote them a letter in mid-August," Buffett shares. "I said, 'Dear Professor Dodd. I thought you guys were dead, but now that I found out that you're alive and teaching at Columbia, I would really like to come.' And he admitted me."
  1. He eats like a 6-year-old.
Buffett’s secret to staying young? Coca-Cola and ice cream.

In an interview with Fortune, Buffett claimed he is “one quarter Coca-Cola” -- "If I eat 2,700 calories a day, a quarter of that is Coca-Cola. I drink at least five 12-ounce servings. I do it every day."

Sometimes for breakfast, he eats a can of Utz potato sticks (yes -- a can, not a bag) to accompany his soda. Other times he takes a sweeter approach and indulges in a bowl of ice cream to jump start his day.

When asked how he’s managed to stay healthy with such a salty and sugary diet, he said, "I checked the actuarial tables, and the lowest death rate is among 6-year-olds. So I decided to eat like a 6-year-old."

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